Speakers

Day One

The exploitation of temporary migrant workers in New Zealand: A troubling landscape

A speaker at the conference

Christina Stringer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Management and International Business at the University of Auckland. Her research into migrant workers began in 2011, when she and colleagues undertook research into the exploitation of migrant fishers on foreign charter vessels fishing in New Zealand’s waters. This research contributed to a Ministerial Inquiry and the enactment of a law requiring all foreign vessels to be reflagged as New Zealand vessels. More recently, Christina’s research has focused on other industry sectors where she has identified troubling accounts of exploitation towards vulnerable temporary migrant workers.

Day Two

United we stand: Mobilizing after the Pike River Coal Mine Disaster

A speaker at the conference

As a solicitor and barrister, Mr Colin Smith joined the legal firm Hannan & Seddon in 1988 and became a partner in 1992. Since his return to the West Coast he has been involved in the community as former Chairperson of the Paroa School Board of Trustees, former Deputy Chairman of Development West Coast, former Chairman of the West Coast Rugby Union and rugby coach for many years, former trustee of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Trust and the current Chairperson of the Pike River Families Group Committee, Pike River 29 Charitable Trust, a member of the Paparoa Great Walk Track and Pike 29 Memorial Track Governance Group  and the Guardians of Paroa Taramakau Coastal Area Trust. In 2015 he was awarded the Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the community.

Traumatic Death at Work: Consequences for Surviving Families

A speaker at the conference

Dr Lynda Matthews is an associate professor in the Ageing Work and Health Research Unit in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney. She is a qualified rehabilitation counsellor who specialises in posttraumatic mental health, rehabilitation and work. Lynda’s research has focused on identifying psychosocial consequences of traumatic workplace injuries and fatalities for families as well as increasing understanding of the psychosocial rehabilitation needs of people with posttraumatic mental health conditions such as PTSD and depression. She recently completed an Australian Research Council funded project with Michael Quinlan and Philip Bohle that documented health, social and financial consequences of workplace death for families, and a Queensland Goverment funded project that examined the expectations, experiences and outcomes of families that have been impacted by a workplace fatality. Lynda is currently working on an international WorkSafe BC funded project with Shannon Wagner and colleagues identifying the work outcomes of and interventions for occupational traumatic exposure. Lynda holds an honorary appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne. She is a rehabilitation advisor for the Australian Federal Government in the area of Veterans Affairs (since 2004) and Defence (since 2013). She was the national psychosocial rehabilitation expert to the working party for the Australian PTSD Treatment Guidelines produced by Phoenix Australia under the auspice of the National Health and Medical Research Council (2007, 2013) and she holds honorary life membership in the Australasian Society of Traumatic Stress Studies and the Rehabilitation Counselling Association of Australasia.

Traumatic Death at Work: Consequences for Surviving Families

A speaker at the conference

Dr Michael Quinlan is professor of Industrial Relation in the School of Management. He also holds an honorary professorial post in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities at the University of Tasmania and a visiting appointment in the Business School, Middlesex University London. His research has focused on work organisation and regulatory aspects of occupational health and safety (OHS), the impact of workplace death and industrial relations history and policy. Together with Lynda Matthews and Philip Bohle (University of Sydney) he undertook an ARC funded study of the impact of traumatic workplace death on families. He has been involved in preparing a number of reports on occupational health and safety for governments (including investigations and audits) in Australia and New Zealand including trucking safety (2001 and 2008), the Beaconsfield gold mine fatality (2006-7), the Comcare Review (2008), the Pike River mine disaster (2011) and audits of the Tasmanian mines inspectorate (2010,2012 & 2014). He has served on a number government OHS advisory bodies including the Expert Reference Group on post-Pike River mine safety regulation and the NZ Extractive Industry Advisory Group (current). In 2006-7 he was member of the team that prepared a report on employment inequalities and health for the World Health Organisation’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. Michael has also been a member of international teams preparing reports on labour inspectorate responses to new and emerging risks at work for the European Commission (2011) and a report on the determinants of OHS practice for the EU Occupational Safety and Health Agency in 2013). He has also done expert work for Safework Australia (including a discussion paper on supply chains and networks in 2013) and the International Labour Organisation (including a working paper on non-standard work and OHS in 2015).

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